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Is the Internet of Things impossible to secure? Part 2

July 2, 2018

Srini CR   

Chief Digital Officer

In part 1 of this blog post, I discussed the growth and evolution of the Internet of Things (IoT) and some of the challenges it presents for security.

Securing IoT devices is challenging for a number of reasons. A rapidly increasing number of gadgets are being turned into smart devices and as manufacturers roll out new products more quickly, little priority is given to security.

Eventually we could see almost every home device connected to the Internet, not necessarily with any consumer benefit but instead geared towards data collection, which is incredibly valuable for manufacturers. A lack of awareness among consumers and businesses is also a major obstacle to security, with the convenience and cost-saving benefits of IoT tech appearing to outweigh the potential risks.

Another challenge is securing not only the IoT devices but also the networks over which their data is transferred. In the past, businesses haven’t always focused on building end-to-end security into the network. This is set to change as attitudes evolve, with 46 per cent of organisations ranking ‘securing IoT within the organisation’ as a high priority for 2018, according to the Hiscox Cyber Readiness Report.

What happens next?

So, is it really impossible to secure the Internet of Things? While it’s certainly a challenge, the industry is developing new ways to protect IoT devices from increasingly sophisticated hackers, and there will be significant opportunities for those working in the IoT security space. Blockchain may well be part of the solution, though a group effort will be needed to ensure that IoT technology evolves in a way that is both beneficial to consumers and businesses and secure from hackers.

Education is also key and makers of IoT devices, ISPs and the government must play a vital role in boosting awareness of IoT security among consumers and businesses. At a government level, it may also be necessary to provide education to boost the digital literacy of policymakers. More regulation and standardisation is needed to ensure that IoT devices adhere to a certain level of security, while manufacturers must develop clear privacy policies for their IoT devices and ensure that consumers know how to adjust the security settings. Even simple steps such as not setting default passcodes as ‘0000’ or ‘1234’ could help keep devices more secure in the future.

While security has too often taken a back seat in the development of IoT technology, manufacturers must begin to build protection into their devices. Network providers can also help address the IoT security threat by creating end-to-end infrastructure that meets industry-wide standards. Providers that offer a secure network will have a competitive advantage in the long run.

 

Read more about securing the IoT here.